Newsroom

Research Progress
  • 09

    11 2022

    MAC Protein Complex Is Essential for Plants to Protect Themselves from DNA Damage

    Recently, researchers from the Qingdao Institute of Bioenergy and Bioprocess Technology (QIBEBT) of the Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS) identified a protein complex, named MAC, required for DNA damage response in plants. This work was published in Plant Physiology on Nov. 04.
      In animals, DNA damage could lead to cancers. Although plants live for a long time without cancers, their growth is always challenged by many environmental factors, such as radiation, salinity, heavy metals and flooding, which can lead to DNA...

  • 08

    11 2022

    New Approach to Fabricating Ion Conducting Ceramic Membranes for Stable Hydrogen Production

    Recently, researchers from the Qingdao Institute of Bioenergy and Bioprocess Technology (QIBEBT) of the Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS) have developed a new “Interface-reaction-induced reassembly” approach to fabricating multilayered ceramic membranes with ceria-based thin-film for stable hydrogen production. The study was published in Angewandte Chemie International Edition on Nov. 3.
      Hydrogen has attracted much attention due to its potential as a clean energy carrier. To date, the majority of hydrogen is produced from fossil fuels, such as natural gas, coal and oil. Such fossil-derived hydrogen must be purified from commo...

  • 02

    11 2022

    Single-cell Raman-based tool developed for efficient mining of live functional microbes from nature

    A new method to find and harvest cells from the environment by screening the cells first and then culturing them was proposed in a paper published in ISME Communications on Oct. 31. They use a technique called single-cell Raman-activated sorting and cultivation.
      Currently, the best way for scientists to isolate a specific microbe with a particular metabolic function from an environment is to take a sample of cells, culture them, and then screen them for the desired cell functions.
      This method has...

  • 24

    10 2022

    Shedding Light on Oceanic Dark Matter: Marine Bacteria Take in Carbon Dioxide through Photosynthesis

    Researchers from the Qingdao Institute of Bioenergy and Bioprocess Technology (QIBEBT) of the Chinese Academy of Sciences have directly identified carbon-dioxide-fixing cells — or cells that take in CO2 — from seawater and used a Raman-spectroscopy technique to determine that their sample contains functioning genes for light harvesting, suggesting that the bacteria do engage in photosynthesis. Knowing whether or not marine microbes engage in photosynthesis — the use of sunlight to turn carbon dioxide and water into energy — could help scientist to learn if ocean bacteria play a role in the global carbon cycle.
      However, most marine...

  • 09

    10 2022

    New Strategies to Accelerate Application of Lithium-rich Mn-based Cathode

    The Solid Energy System Technology Center led by Prof. CUI Guanglei from the Qingdao Institute of Bioenergy and Bioprocess Technology (QIBEBT), Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS), has made important progress in revealing heterogeneous Li+ transport dynamics and regulating anion oxygen stability of LRMO cathode materials. Their findings were published on Aug. 5 in Angewandte Chemie International Edition and Sep. 13 in Advanced Energy Materials, respectively.
      Lithium-rich Mn-based oxide (LRMO) is one of the next generation cathode materials for lithium-ion batteries (LIBs), which is expected to exceed high energy density of 550 Wh kg-1.
      However, the redox reaction of anionic oxygen (O2-) is sl...

  • 01

    10 2022

    Marine Phytoplankton Gets By with a Little Help from Its Bacteria Friends

    A research team from the Qingdao Institute of Bioenergy and Bioprocess Technology (QIBEBT), Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS), have found that Synechococcus and the bacteria that feed on them may have an inherent tendency toward mutualism and will undergo significant changes to encourage each other’s survival. A phytoplankton almost as old as Earth — about 3 billion years compared to the planet’s 4.5 billion years — still holds secrets, including how it can survive starvation in the most nutrient-deficient oceans. Synechococcus is the most geographic...